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Reputation Steps

Monitoring the web for every little mention of your business automatically...

Maintaining Your Online Reputation Steps

Maintaining Your Online Reputation Steps

Maintaining Your Online Reputation Steps

Performing damage control is not enough when you want to be consistent in managing your online reputation. Once you’ve put out the more critical fires, it’s essential that you have a plan in place that focuses on the upkeep. In online reputation management, being reactive is only good if you’re catching up. After that, the goal is to be proactive. That means monitoring, tracking, and constantly updating.

Can you prevent any more bad reviews?

Realistically, you can’t – unless you tirelessly censor every mention online that puts your business in a negative light. In which case, you should probably stop because it’s not a very productive use of your time.

There will always be someone who won’t be very impressed with you or your product or your service, and they might get very vocal about it. You can’t really stop them from doing so, but you can mitigate the damage those reviews can cause.

What are the ways of lessening the damage from bad reviews?

ü Regulate the narrative. Since you can’t control exactly what people say about you, then it’s better that they talk about you where you can see them. This means inviting the conversation to happen in your space – your Facebook page, your website, or your Twitter account. If you have no FB page, create one. If you don’t have a customer feedback form, publish one.

 

If there’s a way to directly address the business when there’s an issue about their product or service, most consumers will use it. Only when that’s unavailable will most of them resort to grumbling on their personal FB account or going on a Twitter rant. You don’t want them to do that. You want the conversation to happen in your space not only so you’re updated but also to make sure you have the capability to moderate it.

 

ü Boost the positive. Post regular updates on all your spaces that put your business in a positive light. This does not only mean good reviews, but basically anything that reinforces the quality of your brand. Share helpful articles related to your industry, upload funny images that also make your audience think, update your status with pertinent info on anything your audience will find useful. Do this regularly, so your prospects and current customers find this first in your spaces and not the bad reviews.

 

ü Monitor and track. Don’t let your reputation get away from you anymore. Set up tracking and monitoring for your brand, business, and keywords to make sure that you’re informed any time anyone says something about you online.

What’s the best way of monitoring and tracking your online reputation?

The goal now is to be on top of the conversation. You’re already aware of the general audience consensus and have done some considerable work into repairing any damage caused by any lack of online reputation management. At this point, you just want to be kept abreast and just using basic Google search is not going to cut it anymore.

You now need the big guns. That means a tool or software that’s designed for online reputation monitoring. How these usually work is you set up the tool with the keywords you want monitored – your business name, your competitor’s, the keyword for your industry, etc. – and the tool will send you an alert when these words are pinged, giving you an opportunity to deal with any issue as soon as it pops.

What features do you need in an online reputation monitoring tool?

ü Real-time updates. Look for a software that you can configure to send alerts as soon as you get an online mention. Many will only send you one email a day and others will require you to log in to the software to access your notifications. These are acceptable options for everyday routine monitoring, but if you’re dealing with a launch or something time-sensitive where you want to be notified as soon as someone mentions your brand or name, then it pays to already have real-time update capability in your tool.

ü Unlimited keywords monitoring. This means you’re looking for a tool that lets you set it up with as many keywords and names to track as you think necessary. The most common limit is five keywords per account, and that won’t do when you’re tracking not only one business and its competitors and keywords, but others as well.

ü Unlimited results. Some tools have a cap on how many results they can send per month depending on the package you’ve purchased. You want the software that will send you as many mentions as your keywords can generate.

ü Direct links to your mentions. For ease of access, you want a tool that takes you to where your keyword was pinged without you having to leave the tool itself.

ü Ability to track all over the internet. You want your tool to be able to scour Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, blogs, forums, news sites – you get the idea. There’s no point of paying for something that only tracks news sites and ignores the discussion happening on social media. You need to have access to all.

Do you also need to focus on good reviews?

Definitely. They say you need at least five good reviews to counteract one bad one. Find those good reviews as well. Be approachable to happy customers. You want them to post about their positive experience so your prospects don’t just get influenced by those that wrote bad reviews.

How do we get people to post positive reviews?

You can do it directly or through some other subtler ways.

The direct method would be to offer your products for free in exchange for a review. Of course, it doesn’t usually follow that the experience for the reviewer is going to be positive, but if you’re confident about what you’re offering, chances are they’ll be writing something good about you. You can also have contests or promos where the winner will then write something about the product. This will work not only to help you get more positive reviews for your brand, but as advertising as well.

A more indirect method of encouraging your happy customers to post about you is making social media sharing buttons prominent on your online spaces. Any time you write a new blog post or record a new YouTube video, close it with something like: “Have a story to share about our product? Email us, leave a comment, or post your story in our Facebook page!” Most of the time, your audience want others to know how much they like your product, they just need to be reminded.

 

 

 

The rising popularity of social media and the internet has made online reputation management a necessity for all kinds of businesses. It’s not just a witty phrase marketers throw around anymore. It’s become an essential part of how you take care of your brand. Be vigilant when it comes to protecting your online reputation. Know what people are saying about you and make sure you have the tools that will help you track your brand and manage the conversation. Remember, bad reviews will influence prospects and can cost new customers while proactive reputation management will engender loyal consumers and invite more. Give your brand’s reputation the focus and work it deserves.

 

For CUTTING EDGE

Reputation and Lead Generation software

Go to: http://ReputationSteps.com

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Conducting Online Reputation Damage Control Steps

Conducting Online Reputation Damage Control Steps

Now that you’re clearer on what the problem is and what your goals are, it’s time to do some damage control. Consider the following questions when putting out some fires related to your online reputation. 

Can you remove negative reviews?

It depends. If the reviews are posted on your space – your Facebook page, website, or YouTube channel – then you have the last say on what content gets to stay. You can remove anything negative about your brand and push the more positive comments on top of the pages. Some online personalities do this with the goal of fostering only positive thoughts on their spaces, especially in the comments thread in YouTube. You really can’t blame them. YouTube is infamous for having some of the most vicious commenters in the entire World Wide Web. If the threads are not moderated, it can get quite ugly.

However, you need to be careful when deleting negative comments and reviews. There’s a difference between removing a mean note from an online troll to removing a valid complaint from a customer. The former is understandable and usually necessary. The latter can send the wrong message to your audience – it might be construed as censorship and can have a negative effect in how your brand is perceived.

In cases like this, it’s better to let the reviews stay – as long as they’re not disrespectful – and just respond to them. This can be a great opportunity for you to give your audience a first-hand look into how your business handles criticisms and customer complaints.

How do you respond to bad reviews?

Very professionally. Here’s a helpful guideline when replying to negative reviews online.

ü Focus on the main issue and gear your response towards it. Some reviews can go on and on since one of the reasons why customers write them is to vent, so you need to be the one to hone in on the specific cause of the complaint. Once you’ve dissected it, construct your reply with that issue as the main focus. This will simplify the conversation, temper the emotions involved, and save everybody’s time.

ü Do some background research. Arm yourself with as much context as possible regarding the customer’s issue. If they’re complaining about a delay in their order, check the appropriate department and confirm the order info. If they’re unsatisfied with how your help desk handled their previous issue, go through the documentation and see what else could have been done. Don’t reply without getting all your facts first. It’s also important that you find out if the issue is an isolated or recurring one so you take the right steps in making sure it doesn’t happen again.

ü Be polite and earnest. Apologize for the issue and thank the customer for taking the time to let you know about it. Starting with something simple but sincere like this will go a long way to making your customer feel better.

ü Identify yourself. Make sure the customer knows who you are and how you’re connected with the company. This will let them know that the right people are paying attention and they’re being taken seriously.

ü Be prompt. Nothing gets upset customers more upset than when they think they’ve been ignored. Always make it a point to reply to complaints within 24 to 48 hours. You want to make sure your side of the story is heard way before other people control the narrative.

 

For CUTTING EDGE

Reputation and Lead Generation software

Go to: http://ReputationSteps.com

Continue reading
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